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Pacific States
The Coalition for the International Criminal Court and its members are calling on the Cook Islands, the Federated States of Micronesia, Niue, Palau, Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu and Kiribati to take the necessary steps to move forward and ratify the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (ICC). Increased ratifications of the Statute in the region will help strengthen the Asia/Pacific voice at the Court and result in a more robust and meaningful participation in the global struggle to establish a truly fair, effective and independent ICC.

To date the Republics of Fiji, the Marshall Islands, and Nauru and the Independent State of Samoa have already become States Parties to the Treaty, and in the extended Asia/Pacific region, Afghanistan, Australia, Cambodia, Japan, New Zealand, Mongolia, Republic of Korea, Tajikistan, and Timor Leste have done so as well. Bangladesh, Solomon Islands, Thailand, and the Philippines signed the Statute, but have yet to complete the process of ratification.

Additional Pacific States Parties to the Court would consolidate the region as fully committed to this historic institution- the first permanent, independent court capable of investigating and bringing to justice individuals who commit the most serious violations of international humanitarian law, namely war crimes, crimes against humanity, and genocide.

Take Action Now!
Write a letter to the Foreign Ministers of the Cook Islands, the Federated States of Micronesia, Niue, Palau, Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu and Kiribati to encourage them to ratify the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (ICC).

You might like to use the following letter as a guide.

Send your letter to:

COOK ISLANDS
H.E. the Hon. Wilkie Rasmussen
Minister of Foreign Affairs & Immigration
PO Box 105 Avarua Rarotonga, Cook Islands
Fax: 682 21247
[email protected]

FEDERATED STATES OF MICRONESIA
H.E. the Hon Mr Leske K Lehsi
Minister of Foreign Affairs
Department of Foreign Affairs
PS123, Palikir, Pohnpei State, FM 96941
Fax: 691-320-2933

NIUE
H.E. Premier Hon Mititaiagimene Young Vivian
Address: Fale Fono, Alofi, Niue Island PO Box 40
Email: [email protected]
Fax: (683) 4206

PALAU
H.E. the Hon. Temmy Shmull
Foreign Minister
Myuns Circle Road
PO Box 100
Koror, Palau 96940
Fax: 680-767-2443
Email: [email protected]


PAPUA NEW GUINEA
H.E. the Hon. Paul Tiesten
Minister of Foreign Affairs
Department of Foreign Affairs
PO Box 422 Waigani, National Capital District, Papua New Guinea
F: 675-325-4886

SOLOMON ISLANDS
H.E. the Hon. Patterson John Oti
Foreign Minister of the Solomon Islands
F: 677-20351

TONGA
H.E. the Hon. Sonapane Tupou
Foreign minister of Tonga
Ministry of Foreign Affairs, PO Box 821 Neuku’alofa, Tonga
F: 676- 23360

TUVALU
H.E. the Hon. Apisai Ielemia
Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs
Fax: 212 808 4975

VANUATU
H.E. the Hon. Sato Kilman
Minister of Foreign Affairs
Fax: 678 27832

KIRIBATI
H.E. the Hon. Anote Tong
President and Foreign Minister
F: 686-21902
E: [email protected] or [email protected]

Your Excellency,

I am writing to you to encourage your government to take all necessary steps to move forward and ratify or accede to the Rome Statute of the ICC. Five years ago, the Rome Statute, the founding treaty of the International Criminal Court (ICC), entered into force. Since then, 139 states have signed and 105 states have acceded to or ratified this treaty.

To date the Republics of Fiji, the Marshall Islands, and Nauru and the Independent State of Samoa have already become States Parties to the Treaty, and in the extended Asia/Pacific region, Afghanistan, Australia, Cambodia, Japan, New Zealand, Mongolia, Republic of Korea, Tajikistan, and Timor Leste have done so as well. Bangladesh, Solomon Islands, Thailand, and the Philippines signed the Statute, but have yet to complete the process of ratification. Additional Pacific States Parties to the Court would consolidate the region as fully committed to this historic institution- the first permanent, independent court capable of investigating and bringing to justice individuals who commit the most serious violations of international humanitarian law, namely war crimes, crimes against humanity, and genocide.

As you are aware, the ICC’s jurisdiction is not retroactive. The Court only has jurisdiction over crimes committed by nationals of states that have ratified the Rome Statute, as well as over crimes committed on the territory of states that have ratified the treaty since its entry into force on 1 July 2002. Furthermore, for states joining after this date, the Court’s jurisdiction begins, according to article 126 of the Rome Statute, the first day of the month after the 60th day following the deposit by such State of its instrument of ratification/accession. The ICC is designed to complement existing national judicial systems, but the Court can exercise its jurisdiction if national courts are unwilling or unable to investigate or prosecute grave crimes. The specific criteria regulating these provisions are carefully defined in the Statute itself and the ICC’s very existence serves as a strong signal to ensure that these heinous crimes will no longer remain unpunished.

Pacific States participated during the Rome Conference negotiations and in the events leading up to the entry into force of the Statute in 2002; and several States in the region have taken a leading role in relation to issues of relevance to the Court. Pacific representation at the ICC was further strengthened by Judge Tuiroma Neroni Slade from Samoa who, in his personal capacity, served as one of the judges at the Court for a period of three years.

Although Asia and the Pacific remain as one of the most underrepresented regions at the ICC, several countries are taking important strides to move forward with ratification/accession to the Statute. Japan became the 105th State Party on July 17 of this year, and Nepal and Indonesia are in the process of preparing for their ratification within the next year. Lao PDR has also announced its intention to accede but has yet to work out the requirements to do so.

Greater commitment to the ICC from the Pacific will demonstrate the region’s determination to ensure accountability and promote human rights and international humanitarian law. At a time when the ICC is beginning its important work to end impunity and currently conducting investigations into four situations, it is crucial that the Court continue to receive support from all regions of the world.

I hope your government will take concrete actions toward ratifying or acceding to the ICC Treaty. We firmly believe that increased ratifications of the Statute in this region will help strengthen the Asia/Pacific voice at the Court and result in a more robust and meaningful participation in the global struggle to establish a truly fair, effective and independent ICC.

Sincerely,

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